‘Where were the women?’: Women active service members of the Provisional IRA in the Northern Ireland conflict

By Charitini (Hari) Ntini- In June 1985, twenty-two-year-old Martina Anderson was arrested in a flat in Glasgow along with four others by armed police officers. She was held and questioned for seven days before being flown to London for further interrogations. Within the next year, she was convicted of conspiring to cause explosions in England.[1]... Continue Reading →

Ulster-Scots and parity of esteem: a partisan tool?

By Nolwenn Rousvoal- Parity of esteem was used as a conceptual tool in the early 1990s in Northern Ireland during the peace negotiation process in order to accommodate the aspirations of nationalists and unionists under the framework of “two traditions”. The idea behind this concept, which is enshrined in the 1998 Belfast/Good Friday Agreement, was... Continue Reading →

Explaining Unionist Crises: The Protocol and the idea of Northern Ireland Independence

By Adam Fusco Five years after the United Kingdom voted to withdraw from the European Union, Brexit continues to shape the political imagination, particularly in places where the majority voted to Remain. In Northern Ireland its unintended offspring, the Northern Ireland Protocol, has come to dominate the political outlook, particularly within Unionism. For many Unionists,... Continue Reading →

Republican Masculinity and the ‘Troubles’

By Bethan Johnson- In the opening pages of his 2001 work Masculinities and Culture, John Beynon reminded his readers: ‘Men are not born with masculinity as part of their genetic makeup; rather it is something into which they are acculturated and which is composed of social codes of behaviour which they learn to reproduce in... Continue Reading →

Voicing Republican Feminism(s)

By Aimée Walsh- My PhD examines testimonies and political writing of gender and the Irish nation between 1975 and 1986. During this time republican prison protest was rife. As such, fractures between the feminist and republican movements were opened. Nationalist feminism in the north of Ireland is an area which has yet to be explored... Continue Reading →

‘Locally, too, the atmosphere brightened’: Kinship among gay rights activists during The Troubles

By Bridget Keown-  Just before 1:00 am on June 3 1979, Anthony McCleave, a thirty-six-year-old Catholic homosexual who worked as a hospital porter, was found lying by a security barrier on Chichester Street by a passer-by.[i] He had severe facial injuries, and despite attempts by the passer-by and the firemen and ambulancemen who eventually arrived... Continue Reading →

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